An odyssey down the world's most incredible waterway,

10,000 years in the making.

In a rapidly changing political landscape, Sea Change follows the stories of four Indonesians connected by one shared resource: the ocean. 

In a rapidly changing political landscape, Sea Change follows the stories of four Indonesians connected by one shared resource: the ocean. 

In November 2014, Indonesian president Joko Widodo delivered a plan to develop Indonesia's waters into "the future maritime axis of the world.” The five-point plan, in just 114 words, tells the tale of a new and very different Indonesia. In this alternate world, small port cities grow into massive nationalized hubs. Twenty-four deep sea cargo ports sprout up across the archipelago to revolutionize domestic and international trade. A "maritime culture" is revived, emphasizing the country’s archipelagic geography with its 10,000 year modern history. Indonesia's sea change of national identity is already beginning. We are here to explore it.

Sea Change, filmed June through July of 2016, is a short documentary film exploring three different generations of Indonesians and their relationships to changing marine ecosystem and maritime economies. Each chapter will follow a character that represents one of the many aspects of new maritime diplomacy.

The industrial hum of Surabaya's Kalimas Port.

The industrial hum of Surabaya's Kalimas Port.

Sea Change will take you to the Wakatobi Islands to the Sama-Bajau community of Sampela, where 95% of the men take to the ocean everyday with spearguns, nets and lines to catch their families breakfast, lunch and dinner. 

Two children paddle through the stilt village of Samplea. 

Two children paddle through the stilt village of Samplea

Moving to Surabaya, Indonesia's most active port city, Sea change will explore the relationship between three generations of ports and the role technologies and infrastructure take in shaping Indonesia maritime trade.

A cargo ship loads for a journey through the world's most highly-trafficked waterway, the Strait of Malacca.

A cargo ship loads for a journey through the world's most highly-trafficked waterway, the Strait of Malacca.

In collaboration with a researcher from Charles Darwin University, Sea Change will explore conservation management in Indonesia's Sawu Sea. With over 70% of the world's coral, preservation of Indonesia and the larger Coral Triangle eco-region has become highly politicized within the last decade. Sea Change will take you below the surface, exploring the intricate counterpoint between political and economic pressures and ecological stability. 

In a nation of 18,000 islands (and counting), fishing takes on a variety of forms.

In a nation of 18,000 islands (and counting), fishing takes on a variety of forms.

 

Sea Change was filmed June through July, 2016.

Sea Change is made possible by The Shansi Fund, The Creativity and Leadership Fund, The Oberlin Ignition Fund, The Taymor Fund, and The Oberlin Career Center.